Discussion:
The Smoking Gun in the Tippit murder that exonerates Oswald
(too old to reply)
Gil Jesus
2007-08-15 17:51:13 UTC
Permalink
The smoking gun in the Tippit murder that exonerates Oswald is this:

The bullets removed from Tippit's body did not match in number or
manufacturer the shells found at the scene of the murder.

Of the four bullets that hit Officer Tippit, three were
Winchester-Westerns and one was a Remington-Peters.

Of the four shells alleged to have been recovered at the crime scene,
two were Winchester-Westerns and two were Remington-Peters.

How could this be ? It can't.

Either the bullets recovered from Tippit's body or the shells are
substitutions, otherwise they would match.

And although it's possible that either one could be forgery, the
evidence leans towards the shells as being the items that were
substituted.

The shells found at the scene were marked by Officer JM Poe, but when
Poe was shown the shells during his testimony before the WC, he would
not identify them as the ones he initialled.
In fact, no one--not Poe, Sgt. Hill, the Davises or Domingo
Benevides---would identify the shells shown to them as the same ones
they found at the Tippit murder scene.

When the Dallas Police were ordered to turn over their evidence to the
FBI, they turned over one shell and only after the FBI inquired to the
whereabouts of the remaining shells were three shells "found" in a
desk drawer at Police Headquarters.

So the "chain of possession" was broken.

Because of a modification to Oswald's handgun, the bullets could not
be ballistically matched to it, to the exclusion of all other weapons.

This played right into the Dallas Police's hands. It saved them the
trouble of having to substitute the bullets.

They knew that the shells found at the scene of the murder were fired
from a .38 automatic and Oswald was carrying a .38 revolver when he
was arrested.

When he arrived at the scene, Sgt. Gerald Hill identified the shells
as coming from "a 38 automatic rather than a pistol".

But they weren't the only ones who knew that the shells found at the
scene were from an automatic.

The witnesses knew also.

I believe that the witnesses who found the shells looked at the bottom
of those shells and saw the marking ".38 auto" on the base. During
their testimony, when they were shown the shells marked ".38SPL", they
refused to identify them.

Why ? Because they KNEW those shells weren't the same ones they found
at the murder scene.

My final point is this, the modification done to Oswald's handgun
would have made any 38 special shell fired from it bulge. Larry Howard
proved this back in the 80's with a .38 handgun with the exact same
modification.

The shells in evidence show no such bulge. Why not ?

Simple: they weren't fired from Oswald's weapon.

They didn't bulge because they were fired from a weapon they were made
to be fired from.

A .38 Special.

Who carried .38 specials ? Law enforcement officers. Which law
enforcement officers were in possession of the shells in the Tippit
murder ?

The Dallas Police.
J***@aol.com
2007-08-15 18:12:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gil Jesus
The bullets removed from Tippit's body did not match in number or
manufacturer the shells found at the scene of the murder.
Of the four bullets that hit Officer Tippit, three were
Winchester-Westerns and one was a Remington-Peters.
Of the four shells alleged to have been recovered at the crime scene,
two were Winchester-Westerns and two were Remington-Peters.
How could this be ? It can't.
Either the bullets recovered from Tippit's body or the shells are
substitutions, otherwise they would match.
And although it's possible that either one could be forgery, the
evidence leans towards the shells as being the items that were
substituted.
The shells found at the scene were marked by Officer JM Poe, but when
Poe was shown the shells during his testimony before the WC, he would
not identify them as the ones he initialled.
In fact, no one--not Poe, Sgt. Hill, the Davises or Domingo
Benevides---would identify the shells shown to them as the same ones
they found at the Tippit murder scene.
When the Dallas Police were ordered to turn over their evidence to the
FBI, they turned over one shell and only after the FBI inquired to the
whereabouts of the remaining shells were three shells "found" in a
desk drawer at Police Headquarters.
So the "chain of possession" was broken.
Because of a modification to Oswald's handgun, the bullets could not
be ballistically matched to it, to the exclusion of all other weapons.
This played right into the Dallas Police's hands. It saved them the
trouble of having to substitute the bullets.
They knew that the shells found at the scene of the murder were fired
from a .38 automatic and Oswald was carrying a .38 revolver when he
was arrested.
When he arrived at the scene, Sgt. Gerald Hill identified the shells
as coming from "a 38 automatic rather than a pistol".
But they weren't the only ones who knew that the shells found at the
scene were from an automatic.
The witnesses knew also.
I believe that the witnesses who found the shells looked at the bottom
of those shells and saw the marking ".38 auto" on the base. During
their testimony, when they were shown the shells marked ".38SPL", they
refused to identify them.
Why ? Because they KNEW those shells weren't the same ones they found
at the murder scene.
My final point is this, the modification done to Oswald's handgun
would have made any 38 special shell fired from it bulge. Larry Howard
proved this back in the 80's with a .38 handgun with the exact same
modification.
The shells in evidence show no such bulge. Why not ?
Simple: they weren't fired from Oswald's weapon.
They didn't bulge because they were fired from a weapon they were made
to be fired from.
A .38 Special.
Who carried .38 specials ? Law enforcement officers. Which law
enforcement officers were in possession of the shells in the Tippit
murder ?
The Dallas Police.
excellent post Gil. It would seem that the shells were fired from a .
38 special AFTER Oswald's handgun was sent to Washington with the
other evidence. When the FBI requested the shells, they couldn't give
them automatic shells, so they just fired off some rounds and sent the
shells to Washington.
j***@gmail.com
2007-08-15 21:03:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by J***@aol.com
Post by Gil Jesus
The bullets removed from Tippit's body did not match in number or
manufacturer the shells found at the scene of the murder.
Of the four bullets that hit Officer Tippit, three were
Winchester-Westerns and one was a Remington-Peters.
Of the four shells alleged to have been recovered at the crime scene,
two were Winchester-Westerns and two were Remington-Peters.
How could this be ? It can't.
Either the bullets recovered from Tippit's body or the shells are
substitutions, otherwise they would match.
And although it's possible that either one could be forgery, the
evidence leans towards the shells as being the items that were
substituted.
The shells found at the scene were marked by Officer JM Poe, but when
Poe was shown the shells during his testimony before the WC, he would
not identify them as the ones he initialled.
In fact, no one--not Poe, Sgt. Hill, the Davises or Domingo
Benevides---would identify the shells shown to them as the same ones
they found at the Tippit murder scene.
When the Dallas Police were ordered to turn over their evidence to the
FBI, they turned over one shell and only after the FBI inquired to the
whereabouts of the remaining shells were three shells "found" in a
desk drawer at Police Headquarters.
So the "chain of possession" was broken.
Because of a modification to Oswald's handgun, the bullets could not
be ballistically matched to it, to the exclusion of all other weapons.
This played right into the Dallas Police's hands. It saved them the
trouble of having to substitute the bullets.
They knew that the shells found at the scene of the murder were fired
from a .38 automatic and Oswald was carrying a .38 revolver when he
was arrested.
When he arrived at the scene, Sgt. Gerald Hill identified the shells
as coming from "a 38 automatic rather than a pistol".
But they weren't the only ones who knew that the shells found at the
scene were from an automatic.
The witnesses knew also.
I believe that the witnesses who found the shells looked at the bottom
of those shells and saw the marking ".38 auto" on the base. During
their testimony, when they were shown the shells marked ".38SPL", they
refused to identify them.
Why ? Because they KNEW those shells weren't the same ones they found
at the murder scene.
My final point is this, the modification done to Oswald's handgun
would have made any 38 special shell fired from it bulge. Larry Howard
proved this back in the 80's with a .38 handgun with the exact same
modification.
The shells in evidence show no such bulge. Why not ?
Simple: they weren't fired from Oswald's weapon.
They didn't bulge because they were fired from a weapon they were made
to be fired from.
A .38 Special.
Who carried .38 specials ? Law enforcement officers. Which law
enforcement officers were in possession of the shells in the Tippit
murder ?
The Dallas Police.
excellent post Gil. It would seem that the shells were fired from a .
38 special AFTER Oswald's handgun was sent to Washington with the
other evidence. When the FBI requested the shells, they couldn't give
them automatic shells, so they just fired off some rounds and sent the
shells to Washington.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
How sweet, Jesus is patting himself on the back again using the jmoore
name. Only because no one else will.
J***@aol.com
2007-08-15 22:20:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by j***@gmail.com
Post by J***@aol.com
Post by Gil Jesus
The bullets removed from Tippit's body did not match in number or
manufacturer the shells found at the scene of the murder.
Of the four bullets that hit Officer Tippit, three were
Winchester-Westerns and one was a Remington-Peters.
Of the four shells alleged to have been recovered at the crime scene,
two were Winchester-Westerns and two were Remington-Peters.
How could this be ? It can't.
Either the bullets recovered from Tippit's body or the shells are
substitutions, otherwise they would match.
And although it's possible that either one could be forgery, the
evidence leans towards the shells as being the items that were
substituted.
The shells found at the scene were marked by Officer JM Poe, but when
Poe was shown the shells during his testimony before the WC, he would
not identify them as the ones he initialled.
In fact, no one--not Poe, Sgt. Hill, the Davises or Domingo
Benevides---would identify the shells shown to them as the same ones
they found at the Tippit murder scene.
When the Dallas Police were ordered to turn over their evidence to the
FBI, they turned over one shell and only after the FBI inquired to the
whereabouts of the remaining shells were three shells "found" in a
desk drawer at Police Headquarters.
So the "chain of possession" was broken.
Because of a modification to Oswald's handgun, the bullets could not
be ballistically matched to it, to the exclusion of all other weapons.
This played right into the Dallas Police's hands. It saved them the
trouble of having to substitute the bullets.
They knew that the shells found at the scene of the murder were fired
from a .38 automatic and Oswald was carrying a .38 revolver when he
was arrested.
When he arrived at the scene, Sgt. Gerald Hill identified the shells
as coming from "a 38 automatic rather than a pistol".
But they weren't the only ones who knew that the shells found at the
scene were from an automatic.
The witnesses knew also.
I believe that the witnesses who found the shells looked at the bottom
of those shells and saw the marking ".38 auto" on the base. During
their testimony, when they were shown the shells marked ".38SPL", they
refused to identify them.
Why ? Because they KNEW those shells weren't the same ones they found
at the murder scene.
My final point is this, the modification done to Oswald's handgun
would have made any 38 special shell fired from it bulge. Larry Howard
proved this back in the 80's with a .38 handgun with the exact same
modification.
The shells in evidence show no such bulge. Why not ?
Simple: they weren't fired from Oswald's weapon.
They didn't bulge because they were fired from a weapon they were made
to be fired from.
A .38 Special.
Who carried .38 specials ? Law enforcement officers. Which law
enforcement officers were in possession of the shells in the Tippit
murder ?
The Dallas Police.
excellent post Gil. It would seem that the shells were fired from a .
38 special AFTER Oswald's handgun was sent to Washington with the
other evidence. When the FBI requested the shells, they couldn't give
them automatic shells, so they just fired off some rounds and sent the
shells to Washington.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
How sweet, Jesus is patting himself on the back again using the jmoore
name. Only because no one else will.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
I noticed that you couldn't debate any of the points being made.

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